Tag Archives: Human Rights

Poem: Night Time in the Mountains By Chairil Anwar

Night Time in the Mountains

By Chairil Anwar, 1946

 

I wonder: Is it this moon that makes
the cold,

makes the houses pallid and freezes the forest?

This is the first time I’ve been so completely able to respond
to the desire:

Hey, there’s a little kid playing tips
with her shadow!

 

 


Pantja Raja, No. 1 Vol. 2, 15 Nov 1946, p. 482.

Decolonization, violence and war in Indonesia, 1945-1950: KITLV/Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies

Decolonization, violence and war in Indonesia, 1945-1950

KITLV / Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies Project

Decolonisation, violence and war in Indonesia, 1945-1950 is a large-scale, joint inquiry carried out by KITLV, the Netherlands Institute for Military History (NIMH) and the NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies. The project has been made financially possible by the Dutch government, due to its decision on 2 December 2016 to lend its support to a broad inquiry into the events of this period.

f1b13645-a88e-4794-8d7d-d947be1dd222The programme comprises nine subprojects and aims to answer questions regarding the nature, extent and causes of structural transborder violence in Indonesia, considered in a broader political, social and international context. In this context, detailed attention will be paid to the chaotic period spanning from August 1945 to early 1945 – often referred to as the Bersiap – and the political and social aftermath in the Netherlands, Indonesia and elsewhere.

It is expected that KITLV will be responsible for the synthesis and will carry out the subprojects Regional Studies and Bersiap. For these projects the group, together with Indonesian colleagues, will carry out research in several Indonesian regions. These subprojects will be the continuation of the KITLV-project Dutch military operations in Indonesia 1945-1950 that has run since 2012.

The programme has a strong international character. There will be cooperation with researchers from Indonesia and other countries involved and sources originating from Indonesia, Australia, United Kingdom and the United States (United Nations) will be used more than previously was the case. Furthermore, the programme explicitly includes the opportunity for witness accounts from the Netherlands and Indonesia to be presented. Witnesses can come forward themselves or will be traced by researchers, in order to allow them to document their personal accounts for future generations.

The three institutes stress the importance of broad national and international support for the programme. In order to achieve this, the institutes have appointed an international scientific advisory board and a Netherlands societal focus group (Maatschappelijk Klankbordgroep Nederland).

For more information see: https://www.ind45-50.org/en

Witnesses

For the purpose of this inquiry, it is important that those involved are seen and heard. If you have material or more information about Indonesia in the 1945-1950 time period and are willing to contribute to our research, please contact: getuigen@ind45-50.nl

Poem of an Old Person Under a Tree By WS Rendra

Poem of an Old Person Under a Tree

By WS Rendra

This is my poem,
an old person standing under this barren tree,
holding both hands behind my back,
and in my mouth a clove cigarette that’s dead.

I behold the age.
I see the state of the economy
in shop windows full of foreign brands,
and the terrible roads between villages
that doesn’t allow any interaction.
I see looting and decay.
I spit on the ground.

I stand at the front of a police station.
I see the bloodied face of a demonstrator.
I see the lawless violence.
And one long road,
full of dust,
full of feral cats,
full of children with scabies,
full of awful terrifying soldiers.

I walk following the sun,
down the byways of the history of development,
that are dirty and full of deceit.
I hear someone say:
“Human rights are not the same everywhere.
Here, to maintain a good climate for development,
political freedoms must be limited.
To overcome poverty
requires the sacrifice of some basic rights.”
My God, what bullshit is this!

Do they think a fart can substitute for a sense of justice?
In this country basic rights are reduced,
in fact to defend the established and the rich.
Workers, farmers, fishers, journalists and students,
are made powerless.

Oh, falsehood that has been deified,
how far can you resist the reality of life.

I hear the roar of the traffic.
I hear the theatre of trials.
I hear the news.
Urban guerrillas running wild in Europe.
A businessman who was a stooge of the fascists,
a hard man who opposed the workers,
was kidnapped and murdered
by a group of people who are angry.

I gaze at the sunset at the harbor.
My feet are aching,
and the cigarette in my mouth is out again.
I see blood in the sky.
Yes! Yes! Violence has begun to entrance people.
The powerful are everywhere pressing.
The angry have begun to bring out weapons.
Bastards are opposed with bastardry.
Yes! This is now the possibility starting to attract people.
If the courts don’t prosecute the official bastards,
then the street bastards are going to be put on trial.
So what says the conscience of humanity?
Who has created this state of emergency?
Do people have to copy the behavior of the official bastards?
If not, why are the official bastards not prosecuted?
What says the conscience of humanity?

Oh, Sunset that blazes!
Brief but thrilling the soul!
Then soon people look for the moon and the stars!

Oh, pictures that are passing!
Because the air over the people is oppressive,
and the air outside is awash with the shimmering twilight,
so conscience is poisoned by deception.
Yes! Yes! I am an old person!
I am tired but haven’t given up the ghost yet.
I stand now at a crossroads.
I feel like my body has become a dog.
My soul still toils to write this poetry.
As a member of humanity.

Pejambon, 23 October 1977
A Picture of Development in Poetry

 


Poem of an Old Person Under a Tree (Sajak Orang Tua Di Bawah Pohon), State of Emergency, W.S. Rendra, Wild & Woolley, Glebe, 1978.

Poem of a Young Woman and Her Boss By WS Rendra

Poem of a Young Woman and Her Boss

By WS Rendra

Do not just grab me any way you feel like it.
It’s pretty clear to me where this is going.
I am no seer,
but I can obviously already see
what this hug means…

Fuck the education I got.
I was taught maths, typing, foreign language, deportment, and administration,
But they forgot to teach me:
If I’m grabbed from behind by the boss,
how should I react then!

Do not grab me any way you feel like it.
Not even my boyfriend dares to be as bold as that.
I can pretty clearly see what your goal is, mister.
When you elbow my tits,
I know what that means……

They taught me to hate sin
but they forgot to teach me
how to find work.
They taught me a lifestyle
whose products do not come from nature.
Taught me to need things that are produced by the bosses,
and controlled by the bosses.
Make-up accessories, air conditioners, synthetic vitamins, tonics, every kind of soda, and school certificates.
Education tided me to their markets, and to their capital.

And now, now that I’m an adult,
where else am I going to run to,
if not to the world of the bosses?

Do not grab me, mister, any way you feel like it.
I’m no academic
but I pretty much know
that all the work on my desk
is going to head in that direction.
Don’t, mister, don’t!
Do not grab me any way you feel like it.
Ah. Oh no.
The money you’re sliding inside my bra, mister,
is my education certificate.
Ah. Yes.
That’s how it is.
You grab me so confidently, mister.
Your fat belly
is pressing against my stomach.
Your fowl mouth
is kissing my mouth.
You do all of this
like it’s all normal, mister.
Every person in the community is helping you.
They grab both my legs.
And they force my thighs open
as you climb on top of my body, mister.

Yogya, 10 July 1975


Poem of a Young Woman and Her Boss (Sajak Gadis dan Majikan), State of Emergency, W.S. Rendra, Wild & Woolley, Glebe, 1978, p. 30.

 

Proyek Tahun 1619 The New York Times

Pada tahun 1619, sebuah kapal muncul di cakrawala ini, di dekat Point Comfort, salah satu pelabuhan di pantai jajahan Inggris yang bernama Virginia. Kapal tersebut membawa lebih dari 20 orang budak Afrika, yang akan dijual kepada para pendatang baru di koloni itu. Semua aspek kehidupan negara yang terbentuk di sini terpengaruh oleh terjadinya perbudakan yang berlanjut selama bertahun-tahun kemudian. Pada peringatan 400 tahun dari momentum yang amat menentukan itu, akhirnya sudah tiba saatnya untuk menceritakan kisah kita dengan jujur.

Proyek Tahun 1619

Proyek Tahun 1619 adalah inisiatif utama dari The New York Times untuk memperingati peringatan 400 tahun dimulainya perbudakan di Amerika. Inisiatif ini bertujuan untuk merumus kembali sejarah negara ini, memahami tahun 1619 sebagai permulaan negara kita yang sebenarnya, dan mengetengahkan konsekuensi dari perbudakan dan kontribusi orang Afrika Amerika di kisah yang kita ceritakan kepada diri kita sendiri tentang siapa kita. (Baca lebih lanjut di https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/08/14/magazine/1619-america-slavery.html)

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