Category Archives: Javanese

A Shred From the Diary of Indonesia: A Collection of Poetry

A Shred From The Diary of Indonesia: A Collection of Poetry

By Emha Ainun Nadjib

Foreword

In the 1970s I learned how to carry a burden. In the 1980s I carried the burden bravely and proudly. In the 1990s I started to be overwhelmed by carrying the burden. In the 2000s I almost gave up because of the burden. By the 2010s I questioned why I should carry the burden, and who the actual official responsible for carrying the burden was.

What you are reading is my expression of and impression about, in, from and towards Indonesia, from the 1980s to the 1990s. Anyone reading it is free to decide what the emphasis is, the poetry, the Indonesia, the me, or the shred.

If the reader focuses their reading on the poems in the book, I am going to be very embarrassed. Because if the book were to be entered into a competition for poetry books, and I was one of the judges, there is no way I would select it as a possible winner.

I really want to write poetry. And in my old age I have been very busy writing poetry. However, there is almost not even one that would I acknowledge as poetry. My work doesn’t get past “intending to write poetry,” “there are elements that are intended to be poetry,” or “officially this is poetry, but whether it deserves the name of and passes as poetry, would require a long discussion and complex considerations.”

Katak

The fact is poetry has come to a halt in the present era. It is no longer a part of the mainstream values that operate in the civilization of contemporary Indonesian people. It is not even remembered by the leaders of the age and the values they espouse. Poetry has been driven into a cave, and those who deal with poetry have become cave-dwelling creatures with shadowy outlines, invisible to the community.

Indonesia, the national ideology Pancasila, the Youth Pledge, the 1945 Constitution, development, progress, government, parliamentarians, government regulations, the president and ministry, all the way down to village regulations, none of them understand poetry. They do not look for poetry. They do not find poetry. They do not remember poetry. There might be a trace of the word “poem” in the far recesses of their brain, but what they understand is not really poetry. Possibly poetry is hidden away somewhere under a pile of garbage, buried under a muddy patch of earth soaked by torrential rain, or hidden in the gloom and weakly crying out the sound of silence in midst of darkness.

Is poetry really this hopeless in the midst of today’s civilization of hyper-materialism? Is it really so pessimistic for poetry in the middle of the stream of robots and  bodies that think of themselves as humans? Has hope completely vanished for poetry in the midst of the life of the human family and the Indonesian nation who desperately pursue the world and material things, but who complain incessantly about the world and material things? In the midst of the arrogance of such breath-taking progress and as they kill themselves to make it into the emergency response unit of the age in pursuit of wealth, position, opportunity, access, assets, and squabble day in and day out about not achieving their worldly desires?

No. Absolutely not. Poetry is not marginal, not marginalized. It is not sidelined or disappeared. Poetry is indeed not food on the plate, a vehicle that is gassed and braked, a house with decor or shopping malls designed by architects to be like paradise. Poetry is not something achieved, but something journeyed towards. Poetry is not something that is held, but a journey to be traveled. Poetry is not something to be grasped or stored in a wallet, but rather something to be cherished and longed for.

Poetry – like the horizon in nature, the sky in the world, justice within sight of the soul, trueness in the recesses of the heart, eternity at the edge of time’s mystery, and God himself who seems to hide behind a secret without ever meeting – is the tenderest point far beyond the spirit, traveled with yearning to return, which encompasses within one speck of the dust of that tenderness the whole of nature and thousands and thousands of universes.

I myself earlier, when that current of energy and magnetism passed right through me whose outpouring is a flow of writings or poems, was captured by the instinct to foster and allow poetry to be a mystery, one which must not lose its essence today. So every day I concentrate on the Indonesia side of it. I am concerned about it, am anxious for it, take care of it. Maybe ever since God inscribed in the Preserved Tablet for me to love, maybe for that reason too I called the book A Shred From the Diary of Indonesia.

Even right up to now, as it is published again, I turn its pages, and my heart and mind is still fixed on Indonesia. But if you go into the “shred” deeply, it feels too broken. Indonesia today is no longer a shred: it’s like an old book lying forgotten in the cupboard, gnawed by rats every night, pages torn to pieces, ripped up, shredded, almost not a single page left intact. It is half-soaked and reeking because it is mixed with the urine of those rats. 

A Shred From The Diary of Indonesia holds out a mirror before my own face. I stare back into my own eyes. I behold growth in decay, a baby in poverty, a young man in old age, a future for all those benighted. The wrinkles of an old face in the mirror, unimaginable weakness and helplessness, but there is a refreshing breeze that springs from the depths of the soul: I will take Indonesia into the future.

If you find any letters and words in the book, flow with them into tomorrow. At the same time, invite the letters and words to flow over you, without any limit in time. One day you will be surprised by death, but that is only a bridge crossing…

Emha Ainun Nadjib
11 November 2016


www.caknun.com

Film: “Bumi Manusia” By Falcon Pictures

New Film “Bumi Manusia” By Falcon Pictures

Blora – Soesilo Toer, brother of Bumi Manusia’s author Pramoedya Ananta Toer, shared his advice on the adaptation of Bumi Manusia to film with director Hanung Bramantyo.

Soesilo Toer wanted to remind the production team to really grasp the meaning of his brother’s work well. He said, “Bumi Manusia had a huge impact in relation to nationalism.”

“When you read the book, it’s not just a matter of the novel Bumi Manusia only, because it’s tied to our nation’s dignity, below the surface,” explained Soesilo Toer when news site Detik.com visited him at home.

Soesilo didn’t deny that for the majority of people who have only scratched the surface of the legendary novel ‘Bumi Manusia’, they’re going to praise the adaptation. But for those who have read the book and understood its deeper significance, they’re most probably going to be against its adaptation into a movie. (Read more from Falcon Pictures here.)

Falcon Pictures https://falcon.co.id/

Movie: Ini Pesan Soesilo Toer Soal Film ‘Bumi Manusia’

7 Potret Seru Gala Premiere Film Bumi Manusia dan Perburuan di Surabaya

Read about Bumi Manusia from GoodReads This Earth of Mankind

Bumi Manusia Dapat Klasifikasi 17 Tahun Ke Atas, Ini Komentar Produser

Javanese Manuscripts

Obit: Vale Arswendo Atmowiloto


Indro: Pemikiran Arswendo Atmowiloto Mempengaruhi Perjalanan Warkop DKI

JAKARTA, (PR).- Komedian Indro Warkop saat ditemui usai melayat di kediaman mendiang Paulus Arswendo Atmowiloto di Jakarta, Sabtu, 20 Juli 2019 dini hari, mengatakan sosok wartawan senior dan sastrawan itu humoris dan konsisten menjalani nilai hidup yang diyakini.

“Dalam guyonannya, ada pesan, ada hal yang benar ingin dia sampaikan secara implisit. Mas Wendo itu sosok yang konsisten, dia seniman banget,” kata Indro, seperti dilansir Kantor Berita Antara.

Walaupun pertemuan antara keduanya tak selalu sering, Indro masih mengingat kepedulian Arswendo terhadap grup lawak Warkop DKI.

“Dulu dia sering kasih informasi, dan minta Warkop nyindir Pakde (sebutan untuk penguasa jaman Orde Baru),” ujar Indro seraya menambahkan keduanya selalu bercakap-cakap dengan menggunakan Bahasa Jawa.

Bagi Indro, sosok dan pemikiran Arswendo saat itu cukup sering mempengaruhi perjalanan Warkop.

“Kita sama-sama (tumbuh) di masa itu, terbiasa seperti saling punya kontribusi terhadap satu sama lain,” ujar Indro yang datang melayat mengenakan topi bertuliskan #kalahkankanker.

Indro Warkop menjadi salah satu pekerja seni yang datang cukup larut ke rumah duka di Jalan Damai, Komplek Kompas, Petukangan Selatan, Pesanggrahan. Ia tiba di lokasi sekitar pukul 12.30 WIB dan langsung memasuki rumah duka untuk memberi penghormatan terakhir ke mendiang Arswendo sekaligus menemui keluarga.

Paulus Arswendo Atmowiloto, seorang sastrawan, wartawan senior, serta penulis serial televisi “Keluarga Cemara” wafat pada usia 70 tahun di kediamannya, sekitar pukul 17.38 WIB, Jumat.

Jenazah Arswendo nantinya akan dipindah ke Gereja Matius, Bintaro, untuk penyelenggaraan Misa Requiem pada Sabtu pukul 10.00 WIB. Setelahnya, jasad Arswendo akan dikebumikan di pemakaman San Diego Hills, Karawang.***

Siska Nirmala Sabtu, 20 Jul 2019, Pikiran Rakyat


Also look at the short story Mrs Geni in December (Bu Geni di Bulan Desember) by Arswendo Atmowiloto published in the national daily newspaper Kompas on 20 May 2012

The Malay Hikayat Inderaputera – Asian and African studies blog of The British Library

Soother of sorrows or seducer of morals? The Malay Hikayat Inderaputera – Asian and African studies blog of The British Library

“Probably composed in the late 16th century, Hikayat Inderaputera was one of the most widespread and popular Malay tales, and is known from over thirty manuscripts dating from the late 17th century onwards. The story is found from Sumatra to Cambodia and the Philippines, not only in Malay but also in Acehnese, Bugis, Makasarese, Sasak, Cham, Maranao and Maguindanao versions (Braginsky 2009). At its core is probably a Persian mathnawi based, in turn, on the Hindi poem Madhumalati written around 1550 (Braginsky 2004: 388), but it also drew on Malay Islamic epics such as Hikayat Amir Hamzah and Javanese Panji stories.” (Read more.)

Opening pages of the Hikayat Inderaputera, with the double decorated frames digitally reunited (as the MS is currently misbound). British Library, MSS Malay B.14, ff. 1v-2r.

Sirat al-mustakim, composed by Nuruddin al-Raniri between 1634 and 1644, a copy from Aceh, 19th century. British Library, Or 15979, ff. 2v-3r.

The manuscript of Hikayat Inderaputera is written in a distinctive neat small hand, with two styles of the letter kaf. In the middle in red is the word al-kisah, with a decoratively knotted final letter, ta marbuta, signifiying the start the episode of Inderaputera’s abduction by the golden peacock: Al-kisah peri mengatakan tatkala Inderaputera diterbangkan merak emas. British Library, MSS Malay B.14, f. 5r (detail).

Source: Soother of sorrows or seducer of morals? The Malay Hikayat Inderaputera, Asian and African studies blog, The British Library